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Featuring hospital and health care headlines from the media and the Web.

Iowa News

Cardiology trend makes its way to Siouxland
A changing health care landscape has thinned the once robust ranks of private cardiologists. aced with ever lower reimbursement rate and growing regulations, dozens of independent cardiology groups — even some of the nation’s largest such practices — have opted to become employees of local hospitals in recent years.(Sioux City Journal)

Winneshiek County Celebration of Life raises more than $16,000 for free mammogram screenings
Winneshiek County Celebration of Life raised more than $16,000 for free mammogram screenings for under or uninsured women in the area at their recent fundraiser. (The Decorah Newspapers)

Munson: Stricken Iowan hopes disabled will do as he did – keep movin’ on
To see Tom Goen shuffle with his cane Wednesday through the hallways of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, wincing with the pain of each step, his journey seemed all the more remarkable. (The Des Moines Register)

Underage ER visits down 26 percent
A recent study showed the number of ER visits from those underage is down since the beginning of the 21-ordinance. But it’s unclear whether drinking has truly decreased or whether phone dial pads simply haven’t been seeing the numbers 9-1-1. (The Daily Iowan)

U.S. News

GE, UPMC announce digital pathology breakthrough
Omnyx, a joint-venture launched in 2008 by GE and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, has started to ship for testing by several leading medical institutions in the U.S. and Canada, new integrated digital pathology technology that boosts collaboration between clinicians and reduces turnaround times for patient tests. (Information Week)

Strides made toward early diagnosing of pancreatic cancer
Researchers have made significant progress in understanding the biology of pancreatic tumors, suggesting that there may be ways of identifying the usually fatal cancer at a much earlier and more treatable stage. (The New York Times)

Polio in retreat: New cases nearly eliminated where virus once flourished
The world’s largest, most intractable source of polio may be on the brink of elimination. (Scientific American)

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Featuring hospital and health care headlines from the media and the Web.

Iowa News

UIHC touts turnarond of transplant center
A University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics leader touted a positive turnaround of UIHC’s organ transplant program on Thursday to the Iowa state Board of Regents. (Iowa City Press Citizen)

What people should know about the FMCH Foundation
The Fort Madison Community Hospital Foundation recently held a dinner for support of the Foundation. I would like to express some feelings on why this Foundation is important for our hospital and our community, and why you should give it your support. (Fort Madison Daily Democrat)

Local treatment is available for breast cancer patients
Some women face it head-on, like any other obstacle in life. Others are overwhelmed by shock and disbelief at the news of being diagnosed with breast cancer. (Clinton Herald)

Iowa Methodist Medical Center Deploys Siemens Unique CT Interventional Solutions
When faced with a growing number of interventional procedures, as well as a heavy flow of imaging exams throughout the day, Iowa Methodist Medical Center found the ideal solution with the SOMATOM® Definition AS 64-slice CT scanner from Siemens Healthcare, equipped with the new Adaptive 3D Interventional Suite. (Medical News Today)

New Siouxland Expansion Hopes To Buck Slow Economy
A new expansion hopes to help Siouxland buck the trend of a slow economy. (Fox44-KPTH, Sioux City)

U.S. News

Social media cuts healthcare costs
Social media initiatives that help physicians, patients, and the medical research community share patient information will drive down healthcare-related costs while improving the quality of care, a report concludes. (Information Week)

Hospitals, Health Systems Drive EHR Adoption
Medical offices owned by hospitals and health systems saw the biggest jump in electronic health record (EHR) adoption rates between January and October 2010, according to the latest results of an ongoing survey released Monday by SK&A, a provider of healthcare information solutions and research. (Information Week)

Physician Panel Prescribes the Fees Paid by Medicare
Three times a year, 29 doctors gather around a table in a hotel meeting room. Their job is an unusual one: divvying up billions of Medicare dollars. The group, convened by the American Medical Association, has no official government standing. Members are mostly selected by medical-specialty trade groups. (The Wall Street Journal)

Glaxo to Pay $750 Million for Sale of Bad Products
GlaxoSmithKline, the British drug giant, has agreed to pay $750 million to settle criminal and civil complaints that the company for years knowingly sold contaminated baby ointment and an ineffective antidepressant — the latest in a growing number of whistle-blower lawsuits that drug makers have settled with multimillion-dollar fines. (The New York Times)

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Featuring hospital and health care headlines from the media and the Web.

Iowa News

Officials break ground on UIHC Coralville clinic
Family care, patient access and decongestion of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics’ main campus are key aspects of a new UIHC Coralville clinic that is being built under a controversial labor agreement. (Iowa City Press Citizen)

Economy at heart of Grassley, Conlin debate
Over a lively hour, U.S. Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and Democratic challenger Roxanne Conlin took decidedly different approaches in a televised debate Tuesday to what they agreed is the public’s top concern, the economy. (Cedar Rapids Gazette)

Trinity nurse honored by March of Dimes
Jane Wiggins, the director of women’s services for Trinity Regional Health System, was selected by the March of Dimes West Region Iowa State Chapter as its 2010 Volunteer of the Year. (Quad City Times)

U.S. News

Health Care Vote Puts Democrats on Defensive
At the start of their debate here last week, the Republican challenger for Congress, State Senator Robert Hurt, paused only long enough to thank the League of Women Voters before ripping into Representative Tom Perriello for voting for “government-run health care.” Mr. Hurt returned to the topic seven times over the next hour, despite being asked only once. (New York Times)

Citing SGR Cuts, Physicians Mull Dropping Medicare Patients
Two of three medical practices surveyed—67% of respondents—say they will either limit the number of new Medicare patients they accept or stop seeing Medicare patients altogether if Congress does not halt reimbursement cuts of about 30% that take effect by the end of the year, survey by the Medical Group Management Association shows. (Health Leaders Media)

It’s Not Over: Consumer Groups Still Worried About Insurance Rules
Just last week, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners voted on tough new rules for insurers that will govern how much they have to pay out in medical care versus overhead and profits. It was a big win for Democrats and consumer groups, who had worried that last-minute pressure from insurers could weaken this aspect of the health law. (Wall Street Journal Health Blog)

Hospitals designing senior ERs to cater to needs of the elderly
When 85-year-old Aloysius “Al” Boroniec fell twice in a matter of weeks, he found treatment for his injuries in a different kind of emergency room — one that caters specifically to the needs of seniors.

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Keith Garber(IHA recently announced the 2010 recipients of the Iowa Hospital Heroes Award.  Each week, one of those Heroes will be featured on the IHA blog.)

Keith Garber
Physician
Wayne County Hospital, Corydon
 

Dr. Keith Garber exemplifies the ideal small-town doctor. He served Wayne County communities for 46 years, caring for multiple generations of families, delivering many of the babies that came along. His commitment to his patients in southern Iowa was unwavering.  

Originally from Anderson in deep southwestern Iowa, Dr. Garber completed his premedical studies at Drake University and the University of Nebraska. He received his M.D. from the University of Iowa in 1958.   Following medical school, he served three years in the United States Navy Medical Corps. After his discharge, Dr. Garber established the Corydon Medical Clinic which served the community until his retirement.  Dr. Garber, a devoted family man, and his wife, Ann, raised four children.

Dr. Garber held every office on Wayne County Hospital’s medical staff. He provided leadership as the longtime medical director for Corydon Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Seymour Care Center and Hospice of Central Iowa in Centerville. He served as the Wayne County Medical Examiner for 23 years. Throughout his career he has been a valued mentor for his colleagues.

For several years, Dr. Garber was the sole physician in the area. His dedication to his profession and his patients played an essential role in the medical services available today.

Dr. Garber believes in the vitality of our community and is involved in many community activities including Chamber of Commerce, Community Betterment, Lions and Masons.  He served on the Corydon City Council for 20 years.  He shared his love of theater by directing a variety of Theater on the Square productions over the years.  And he has always been active in his church.

A quote from one of his former employees is most fitting: “I know there are plenty of physicians who are touching lives every day. But I also know this is a man beyond compare. I believe they broke the mold with him and there will be few family physicians who sustain a community and a hospital the way he has done. He is a humble and gracious man who would not necessarily enjoy this praise, but every single word of it is deserved and heartfelt.”

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Featuring hospital and health care headlines from the media and the Web.

Iowa News
Preserving the Legacy of Genesis
A repaired statue of Mary, the Blessed Mother, is once again resting in the historic Sacred Heart Cemetery on the campus of Genesis Medical Center, West Central Park.  (Genesis Health System website)

Insurance Changes
An Iowa health care provider says it is changing health care benefits for one group of workers. Those affected say they way they see it, their benefits are being cut. (WHO-TV)

U.S. News

Patient, heal thyself
The mean charge for outpatient surgery was $6,100 versus $39,000 for inpatient surgery in 2007, according to the most recent report on surgical costs from the federal government.  (The Wall Street Journal)

Sleeve system links surgeons to computer
Computers seem to be everywhere these days, and operating rooms are no different. Computers identify maladies, store and make immediately accessible patients’ medical data, capture and display video and take precise measurements inside the body.  (The Journal Gazette)

Seeking proof in near-death claims
At 18 hospitals in the U.S. and U.K., researchers have suspended pictures, face up, from the ceilings in emergency-care areas. The reason: to test whether patients brought back to life after cardiac arrest can recall seeing the images during an out-of-body experience. (The Wall Street Journal)

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